As your cat ages, the chances of it losing its hearing increase. With proper love, food, and care, it is a lot less likely but it does happen. Whether it is an elderly cat or a young kitten who is deaf, you have to understand how to better take care of them.

Caring for a Deaf Cat

You will need to approach your cat with a basic understanding that even though they are deaf, they are more than capable of understanding you. Every living creature can feel vibration. You will need to use this to allow your cat to know where you are and what you are doing. You will have to walk heavy when approaching so you do not scare them and use signals to get their attention. Signals can be done using lights be it ceiling lights or flashlights. 

You should never leave a deaf cat home alone for long periods of time. Accidents can happen, especially with other pets under the same roof. If you must be gone more than 8 hours, have someone watch over your cat.

Deaf Cats Scare Easy

Sudden appearances of objects, pets, or people will scare a deaf cat significantly. If your cat is sleeping, allow them to sleep. If you absolutely have to wake them up, do as you would a baby. Very faint touches to slowly wake them up or tap near the area your cat is sleeping by. The vibrations alone should get their attention. You can also wake them up with light, but please don’t go shining a bright flashlight in the cat’s face. Do this with room lighting.

Training is Needed

You will need to relearn how to train your cat. Hand signals and eye contact are very important. As you are training them to respond to your motions, reward them when they do it properly. You will have to find which method of training works best for your cat and you.

Introducing a New Housemate

If you are looking into getting another cat (or other pet), you have to make sure both will get along well. What this means for you is doing your research. Don’t just allow any new animal into your home. Kittens genuinely do fine with deaf cats, though their claws can be an issue. I am against declawing cats but there is an option to have the cat wear claw caps. As for dogs, I highly recommend getting an adult dog over a puppy. Puppies are spastic by nature and can hurt a deaf cat very easily, even the smaller breeds. Only adopt a dog you know is calm, relaxed, and easy-going.

Are you caring for a deaf cat? What are some things you do to make life easier for them? Share in the comments!

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Jay Wright
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Jay Wright

Great post, very essential information.

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